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PAN Spotlight

 

On the Line with Daisy: Meet PAN's Patient and Provider Representatives

Our call center representatives are the threads that connect patients, providers and pharmacists with PAN’s life-changing assistance. We hope that this blog series helps you get to know the wonderful people who are the front lines of our team, ready to offer caring and compassionate service to you and the patients you serve.

 

Meet Daisy, a member of the PAN Income Verification team, who shares with us a little about herself and the heartwarming connections she’s made with patients. 

 

What's your favorite part of your job?

My favorite part of the job is speaking to patients from all over and hearing their stories. Talking to couples that have been together for over 30 years, or a patient speaking about their career and family is heartwarming. The patients offer so much on these short calls despite all that they are going through.

 

What motivated you to join PAN's call center team?

I joined the team as a temp during our last surge season. I realized I was given the opportunity to work at a great organization and immediately knew I wanted to stay and be part of making a difference.

 

How do you describe your work to people who don't know about PAN?

When people ask what I do, I tell them I have the pleasure of helping people access life-saving medications by providing them with grants to pay for their prescriptions.

 

Tell us something that others would be surprised to know about you. 

I always joke about my bad knees and how I’m too old to do anything, so I think most people would be surprised to know that I was the co-captain of my college marching band color guard.

 

The captain and I would choreograph and execute our routines. I also lead the team when we would dance battle teams from other HBCU’s, especially our rival Lincoln University.

 

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Focused, passionate and hardworking.

 

What are your tips for having a great phone conversation with patients or providers?

Always place yourself in the other person’s shoes.

 

 

 

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